Deep Throat: What Maimonides Teaches Us About Our Obsession With Jamie Dimon’s Cancer

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Excerpted from a Forbes.com article by Craig Hatkoff and Irwin Kula: Can the upsurge in and nature of the media coverage regarding Jamie Dimon’s throat cancer provide a lens into the economic, political, social and cultural zeitgeist? The market cap of the company did drop 1%, (roughly $2 billion) before slightly bouncing back the day after the announcement of the JP Morgan CEO’s illness suggesting the stock price impact of his health prospects were not trivial. But at a time when Dimon and his family are entitled to privacy there is a fascinating set of issues that invite dissection, analysis and unfortunately speculation about his illness and its implications for the company. A clearly sensitive topic that should be handled delicately, there seems to be undue attention and a near obsession with Dimon’s illness if evidenced only by Matt Herper’s piece on Forbes.com with 1.3 million views as of this writing. Then there are the disingenuous suggestions on Gawker.com as to Dimon’s possible successor—Elizabeth Warren anyone?

To help understand what is underlying this unusual amount of  attention, perhaps we can turn to the wisdom of twelfth century Jewish rabbi-philosopher-scholar. Maimonides, the unparalleled codifier of Jewish law, wrote the mishnah torah that made the voluminous complex of Jewish laws simpler and more accessible to those without stratospheric IQs. Maimonides, one of the great disruptive innovators in history, was master of multi-level meaning making, interpretations and partial truths for the enlightened scholar but simultaneously offered simple, metaphorical explanations for the common man who had neither the time, interest nor faculty for thinking too much. The KISS theorem all the way. Maimonides was also particularly influential on writings theologian Thomas Aquinas. His reach was vast…

Read the full Forbes article online on the Off White Papers blog. Originally written by Craig Hatkoff and Irwin Kula and published on July 7th, 2014, the Off White Papers are part of Forbes’ Leadership section, contemplating the deeper, disruptive angles of historically and emerging innovations from healthcare and politics to arts and culture.  

 

 

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